Colorado Mountain Club Blog

Another day on the trail

Category: High Altitude

Common Effort of Will and Strength

Mount Rainier (14,410’) High Altitude Mountaineering School Graduation Team at Camp Schurman, July 2012. Photo courtesy of Vern Bass.

Many a mountaineer has mentioned at one time or another that mountaineering is ‘the kind of thing that is fun to talk about when you’re done.’ That is to say, the act of mountaineering, itself, is sometimes the farthest thing from fun. Yet, we do it. Maybe it’s that somehow the suffering creates the reward. […]

When Nobody’s Watching

Starting up Green Mountain (8,150’) outside of Boulder, CO, March 1st, 2015. Photo Courtesy of Jim Berryhill.

  My knee has heeled to the point where I can begin climbing, again, in the variable conditions you get when you leave the safe confines of the gym. When preparing for an expedition, gym work is important as it lets you focus on specific areas of physical improvement within a controlled environment. However, it […]

Do It Yourself Classic Corn Dodgers

Make sure you are getting the nutrition you need on every outdoor adventure. Try making this tasty snack. Classic Corn Dodgers This old-fashioned cross between pancakes and corn bread is best enjoyed while backpacking with views of alpine meadows. Don’t forget the honey. Before the trip, mix the dry ingredients together: 1 cup white flour […]

Glaciers are Hot

Glaciers 1TT_Winter2010

By Chris Case For years, scientists have been studying and reporting on the accelerating rates of retreat of the world’s ice sheets (the largest glaciers), the decline of mountain glaciers big and small, and the subsequent rise in sea levels. Media reports have followed: retreating glaciers around the world (at the poles, in the Alps, […]

Six Years in the Making

Me, rappelling into the notch on the east ridge of Mount Bancroft (13,250’) August 30, 2014. Photo courtesy of Jim Berryhill.

“Am I ready? I’m putting in the hours… into planning, into training, into mental preparation. But am I ready?” This is a necessary thought. Certainly, it can be destructive if you let it fester into self-doubt; but without this thought, I would argue that you are lacking a critical reflex of self-assessment. Frankly, it goes […]

Only Half Done

My wife, Kristina, repacking gear from pack to duffel in the parking lot of Mount Rainier (14,410’). July, 2012.

Another Quote from Aristotle: “Well begun is half done.” It’s been a busy two-to-three weeks for team Rocky Mountain Sourdoughs, as we prepare for Denali. The bulk of the team has been out on a few hut trips. I have yet to recover from my knee injury enough to join them. However, I have been […]

Eatting Your Way to the Top

TT_Fall2009 do it yourself

By Chris Case The saying goes, “You are what you eat.” But, perhaps it should be, “You should eat for what you are.” Are you a hiker? Are you a track sprinter? Especially when it comes to athletics—including hiking up that fourteener on the weekend, or hiking the Colorado Trail all week—your performance, enjoyment, and […]

The Habit of Excellence

Rocky Mountain Sourdoughs (Denali team) member Jim Berryhill carrying a heavy pack on Mount Beristadt, October 25th, 2014.

Aristotle wrote, “Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.” These words ring true to me, now more […]

Climbing Ouray’s Mammoth Icicles

Ouray Icicles1_Winter2013

By Anne Martin Combining weight-shifting technique and strength, the climbers ascend gracefully and quickly, occasionally resting on their holds or the ropes to shake blood flow back into their frozen hands. The canyon echoes with the sharp sounds of metal on metal and the loud clinks of metal on ice, while the soft sound of […]

On Setbacks

The view from just below Camp Hazard on the rock rib between the Wilson and Kautz Glaciers on Mount Rainier (14,410’). June 18th, 2013.

You may recall from a previous blog post that I’ve had some knee surgeries: three of them, to be exact. I first tore my right ACL in November of 2007, with surgery happening early the next year. That first repair failed six months later, and I had a second ACL reconstruction – or ACL “revision” […]